The growing acceptance of autism in the workplace – CBS News


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Twenty-seven-year-old Christopher Pauley thought he had it all figured out when it came to looking for a job. He had a detailed spreadsheet of each and every position he applied for -- at least 600. But despite his degree in computer science from California Polytechnic State University, he went two years with barely a nibble. Did he get discouraged? "Oh my gosh, my morale really started to drop
Christopher and a CoWorker at Microsoft

Christopher and a CoWorker at Microsoft

towards the end," he said. "In fact, there were days where I would either hardly fill out any applications at all, or just simply not apply on anything." He knew he had the smarts for most jobs; he was a former Spelling Bee Champ, after all. But Pauley struggles with social and communications skills because he's also autistic. While precise numbers are hard to come by, by some estimates at least 80% of adults with autism are unemployed, even though their IQs are often well above average. Sometimes their job skills can present themselves in unique ways. For Christopher, it's video games. His ability to recognize patterns and his acute attention to detail -- both hallmarks of autism -- make his playing the video game Rock Band look pretty easy.
Source: The growing acceptance of autism in the workplace - CBS News

About NCATP

The North Carolina Assistive Technology Program (NCATP) leads North Carolina's efforts to carry out the federal Assistive Technology Act of 2004. We promote independence for people with disabilities through access to technology. Visit our website at http://ncatp.org
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