Brain Composer: ‘Thinking’ melodies onto a musical score


TTS Demo
 Gernot Müller-Putz, head of TU Graz' Institute of Neural Engineering
This is Gernot Müller-Putz, head of TU Graz' Institute of Neural Engineering and expert on brain-computer interfaces.
Credit: © Lunghammer - TU Graz

Brain-computer interfaces, known as BCI, can replace bodily functions to a certain degree. Thanks to BCI, physically impaired persons can control special prostheses through the power of their minds, surf in internet and write emails.

Under the title of "Brain Composer," a group led by BCI expert Gernot Müller-Putz from TU Graz's Institute of Neural Engineering shows that experiences of quite a different tone can be sounded from the keys of brain-computer interfaces. Derived from an established BCI method which mainly serves to spell -- more accurately -- write by means of BCI, the team has developed a new application by which music can be composed and transferred onto a musical score -- just through the power of thought. All you need is a special cap which measures brain waves, the adapted BCI, a software for composing music, and of course a bit of musical knowledge. The basic principle of the BCI method used, which is called P300, can be briefly described: various options, such as letters or notes, pauses, chords, etc. flash by one after the other in a table. If you're trained and can focus on the desired option while it lights up, you cause a minute change in your brain waves. The BCI recognises this change and draws conclusions about the chosen option. The short video "Sheet Music by Mind" gives an impression of composing music using BCI: https://www.tugraz.at/institute/ine/research/videos/
Source: Brain Composer: 'Thinking' melodies onto a musical score: New brain-computer interface application developed that allows music to be composed by the power of thought -- ScienceDaily

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The North Carolina Assistive Technology Program (NCATP) leads North Carolina's efforts to carry out the federal Assistive Technology Act of 2004. We promote independence for people with disabilities through access to technology. Visit our website at http://ncatp.org
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